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Equity, Diversity & Inclusion

Resources for studying, reflecting, and taking action in issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion

In a racist society, it is not enough to be non-racist, we must be anti-racist.

~ Angela Davis 

Books & eBooks About Racism and Related Topics

So You Want to Talk about Race

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to "model minorities" in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.

How to Be an Antiracist

Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society.

Stamped from the Beginning

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. Some Americans insist that we're living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever.

Just Mercy

A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice--from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time

White Fragility

Why it's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

The Color of Law

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation--that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation--the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments--that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

The Fire Next Time

A national bestseller when it first appeared in 1963, The Fire Next Time galvanized the nation and gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement. At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin's early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document.

Racism in America

This book explains how race, once a differentiating factor, became a major basis for stratification in the United States that pervaded scientific thought, religious doctrine, governmental policy, and the patterned actions of decision-makers in all sectors of social life.

Women, Race, and Class

A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders.

We Too Sing America

In We Too Sing America, nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flashpoints, from the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51 Community Center in Lower Manhattan. Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant surveillance.

They Can't Kill Us All

A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it.

Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist

From a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, the powerful story of how a prominent white supremacist changed his heart and mind. This is a book to help us understand the American moment and to help us better understand one another.

Raising Racists

White southerners recognized that the perpetuation of segregation required whites of all ages to uphold a strict social order -- especially the young members of the next generation. White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy.

The Sum of Us

Heather McGhee's specialty is the American economy--and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. From the financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the most obvious indignities for people of color. Racism has costs for white people, too. It is the common denominator of our most vexing public problems, the core dysfunction of our democracy and constitutive of the spiritual and moral crises that grip us all.

Articles & Website Links

Videos

Three racially diverse people looking on the same direction

Books for Children & Young Adults

This Book Is Anti-Racist

Who are you? What is racism? Where does it come from? Why does it exist? What can you do to disrupt it? Learn about social identities, the history of racism and resistance against it, and how you can use your anti-racist lens and voice to move the world toward equity and liberation.

The Black Friend: on Being a Better White Person

Writing from the perspective of a friend, Frederick Joseph offers candid reflections on his own experiences with racism and conversations with prominent artists and activists about theirs--creating an essential read for white people who are committed anti-racists and those newly come to the cause of racial justice.

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

 This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited. Through a gripping, fast-paced, and energizing narrative written by beloved award-winner Jason Reynolds, this book shines a light on the many insidious forms of racist ideas--and on ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

March Forward, Girl

Long before she was one of the Little Rock Nine, Melba Pattillo Beals was a warrior. Frustrated by the laws that kept African-Americans separate but very much unequal to whites, she had questions. Combined with emotive drawings and photos, this memoir paints a vivid picture of Beals' powerful early journey on the road to becoming a champion for equal rights, an acclaimed journalist, a best-selling author, and the recipient of this country's highest recognition, the Congressional Gold Medal.

The Talk

In the powerful follow-up to We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices, thirty diverse and award-winning authors and illustrators capture frank discussions about racism, identity, and self-esteem. Here is an invitation to all families to be advocates and allies for change.

Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer

Stirring poems and stunning collage illustrations combine to celebrate the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a champion of equal voting rights. "I am sick and tired of being sick and tired." Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977.

Choosing keywords

The SCF Libraries Catalog (Quick Search) and the Library Databases use specific terms or keywords to help organize items that are similar in subject. Those terms help users discover more sources related to a particular topic. Think of it as "hashtags" that we used since before hashtags existed!

However, keep in mind that this shared vocabulary is a product of society, based within a historically white profession and culture. Some terms are dated and might be offensive or inappropriate for current standards. There are librarians involved in social justice work who seek to disband antiquated and offensive terms, but that is a work in progress.

"Keyword/subject terms" evolve over time as society changes and research develops.

Terms that refer to specific groups have changed over time, for example: "African Americans", "negroes" or "Black people". Latino Americans sometimes are classified under "Hispanic Americans" or "Latinos" even if they mean different things, etc. 

Remember, when you find a good article, ebook, evideo or website, keep track of the keywords used in that source and search using those terms too.  Different databases use different keywords so rotating and trying different terms is important. 

 

 

Here are some examples of keywords/subject terms that you can use to search for sources:

  • Racism
  • Racism -- United States -- History
  • Racism - Law & legislation
  • "African Americans"
  • African Americans -- Civil rights
  • "Race relations"
  • "Anti racism" or "ANTI-racism"
  • "Asian Americans"
  • "Hispanic Americans"
  • "Racial profiling"
  • "Black Lives Matter Movement"

 

*Note: The quotation marks ("  ") around two or more words help to keep those words together in the search.

 

College Resources

SCF Statement of Non Discrimination

State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota does not discriminate on the basis of sex, pregnancy, race, religion, age, national origin/ethnicity, color, marital status, disability, genetic information or sexual orientation in any of its educational programs, services and activities, including admission and employment. Direct inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies to: Equity Officer, 941-752-5323, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207.

State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota no discrimina en base a sexo, embarazo, raza, religión, edad, origen nacional/origen étnico, color, estado civil, discapacidad, información genética o la orientación sexual en cualquiera de sus programas educativos, servicios y actividades, incluyendo la admisión y empleo. Dirija las consultas sobre las normas de no discriminación a: Equity Officer, 941-752-5323, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207.

 

Regenail Thomas

College Equity Officer and ADA Coordinator
(941) 752-5323 (or extension x65323) - ThomasR@SCF.edu

Equity Officer: contact for discrimination or harassment complaints/grievances pertaining to sex, race, religion, age, national origin/ethnicity, color, marital status, disability, genetic information, sexual orientation and any other factor prohibited under applicable federal, state, and local civil rights laws, rules and regulations.

 

Diversity & Multicultural Awareness Committee (DMAC)

Related Student Clubs:

Hispanic/Latino Heritage Club

Advisor: Eric Cintron

E-mail: cintroe@scf.edu

The Hispanic Latino Heritage Club will meet and lead events to share their culture with students, faculty and staff at SCF.