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Equity, Diversity & Inclusion

Resources for studying, reflecting, and taking action in issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion

“The world worries about disability more than disabled people do.”

~ Warwick Davis

Books & eBooks

Ableism in Academia: Theorising Experiences of Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses in Higher Education

Rather than embracing difference as a reflection of wider society, academic ecosystems seek to normalise and homogenise ways of working and of being a researcher. As a consequence, ableism in academia is endemic. Through reporting research data and exploring personal experiences, the contributors theorise and conceptualise what it means to be/work outside the stereotypical norm.

A Disability History of the United States

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative.

Allies for Inclusion: Disability and Equity in Higher Education

Here is an overview of students with disabilities in postsecondary institutions and the importance of allies in their lives. It is a call to action for faculty, staff, and administrators in all facets of higher education, and emphasizes the shared responsibility toward students with disabilities and toward creating meaningful change.

From Disability to Diversity

Colleges and universities are seeing increasing numbers of students with a range of disabilities enrolling in postsecondary education. Many of these disabilities are invisible and, despite their potential for negative impact on students' academic and social adjustment, some students will choose not to identify as having a disability or request support. Approaching disability from the perspective of difference, the authors of this new volume offer guidance on creating more inclusive learning environments on campus so that all students--whether or not they have a recognized disability--have the opportunity to succeed.

From High School to College: Steps to Success for Students with Disabilities

College is a different world from high school - and the laws, expectations, and culture around disability services and accommodations are different, too. This one-of-a-kind, step-by-step guide is an essential resource for college-bound students, their families, and the special educators and school counselors who work with them.

Disability in Higher Education

Create campuses inclusive and supportive of disabled students, staff, and faculty Disability in Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach examines how disability is conceptualized in higher education and ways in which students, faculty, and staff with disabilities are viewed and served on college campuses.

Enabling University

This work takes the most recent, interdisciplinary research and demonstrates how to make higher education institutions open, accessible and socially just for staff and students with disabilities.

AD/HD and the College Student

This is the essential handbook and comprehensive resource for college students with AD/HD. Bestselling author Dr. Pat Quinn answers the most common questions and tackles the most challenging problems students with AD/HD face in college.

Articles & Website Links

Videos & eVideos

Databases for further research

Keywords

The SCF Libraries Catalog (Quick Search) and the Library Databases use specific terms or keywords to help organize items that are similar in subject. Those terms help users discover more sources related to a particular topic. Think of it as "hashtags" that we used since before hashtags existed!

However, keep in mind that this shared vocabulary is a product of society, based within a historically white profession and culture. Some terms are dated and might be offensive or inappropriate for current standards. There are librarians involved in social justice work who seek to disband antiquated and offensive terms, but that is a work in progress.

"Keyword/subject terms" evolve over time as society changes and research develops.

Terms that refer to specific groups have changed over time, for example, the use of "crippled" or "handicapped" has evolved into "people with disabilities", or more specific terms, such as "hearing impaired" or "blind", etc.

Remember, when you find a good article, ebook, evideo or website, keep track of the keywords used in that source and search using those terms too.  Different databases use different keywords so rotating and trying different terms is important. 

 

 

Here are some examples of keywords/subject terms that you can use to search for sources:

  • "People with disabilities"
  • Ableism
  • Prejudices
  • "Discrimination against people with disabilities"
  • "Disability laws"
  • Accessible
  • "Accessible design"

 

*Note: The quotation marks ("  ") around two or more words help to keep those words together in the search.

Books for children

Just Ask!

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and award-winning artist Rafael Lopez create a kind and caring book about the differences that make each of us unique.

El Deafo

 Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful--and very awkward--hearing aid. 

Rescue and Jessica

Based on a real-life partnership, the heartening story of the love and teamwork between a girl and her service dog will illuminate and inspire.

Wonder

 I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse. August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid--but his new classmates can't get past Auggie's extraordinary face. 

Emmanuel's Dream

Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah's inspiring true story--which was turned into a film, Emmanuel's Gift, narrated by Oprah Winfrey--is nothing short of remarkable. Born in Ghana, West Africa, with one deformed leg, he was dismissed by most people--but not by his mother, who taught him to reach for his dreams. As a boy, Emmanuel hopped to school more than two miles each way, learned to play soccer, left home at age thirteen to provide for his family, and, eventually, became a cyclist. He rode an astonishing four hundred miles across Ghana in 2001, spreading his powerful message: disability is not inability. Today, Emmanuel continues to work on behalf of the disabled. 

I am Not a Label

This book brings together 34 disabled artists, thinkers, athletes and activists from past and present. Find out how these iconic figures have overcome obstacles, owned their differences and paved the way for others by making their bodies and minds work for them. These short biographies tell the stories of people who have faced unique challenges which have not stopped them from becoming trailblazers, innovators, advocates and makers.

College Resources

SCF Statement of Non Discrimination

State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota does not discriminate on the basis of sex, pregnancy, race, religion, age, national origin/ethnicity, color, marital status, disability, genetic information or sexual orientation in any of its educational programs, services and activities, including admission and employment. Direct inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies to: Equity Officer, (941) 752-5323, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207.

State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota no discrimina en base a sexo, embarazo, raza, religión, edad, origen nacional/origen étnico, color, estado civil, discapacidad, información genética o la orientación sexual en cualquiera de sus programas educativos, servicios y actividades, incluyendo la admisión y empleo. Dirija las consultas sobre las normas de no discriminación a: Equity Officer, (941) 752-5323, 5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207.

 

SCF Students:

 
Disability Resource Center:

DRC Bradenton Office: 941-752-5295 or DRC@SCF.edu

Alissa Kashdin, Staff Assistant III KashdiA@SCF.edu

Mary Hoffman, Accommodation and Assistive Technology Specialist - HoffmaM@SCF.edu

Patricia Lakey, Coordinator - LakeyP@SCF.edu

Jennifer Meier, Site Manager, Venice Disability Resource - MeierJ@SCF.edu    

SCF Staff:

Equity Officer and ADA Coordinator: Regenail Thomas
5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207; (941) 752-5323

Section 504 Coordinator: Gloria M. Tracy
5840 26th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207; (941) 752-5506